TPM Asia 2017

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Tuesday, Oct 10, 2017

    • 2:00 pmRegistration

      Location: Hotel Lobby

    • 5:30 pmWelcome Reception

      Location: Pipette's Intercontinental Shenzhen

Wednesday, Oct 11, 2017

    • 7:30 amRegistration

      Location: Hotel Lobby

    • 7:30 amWelcome Coffee & Tea

      Location: Espana Ballroom Foyer

    • 8:30 amWelcome Remarks

      Location: Espana Ballroom I

    • 9:00 amKeynote Address

      Location: Espana Ballroom I

      Global demand for container shipping services continues to strengthen, providing a long overdue and much-needed fillip to an industry long challenged by low rates and wafer-thin margins. The improved business environment is helping to mask some of the core challenges operators face, including the chronic problem of overcapacity, and emerging issues such as how to deal with new environmental requirements around ballast water treatment and reduction of CO2 emissions. The extra costs related to the latter are a particular concern. With the 2020 deadline looming, time is rapidly running out for owners and operators to choose their preferred strategy to reduce carbon output. Are vessels to be retrofitted with scrubbers? Are LNG engines to be used? Will operators take their chances in the market and rely on low-sulfur fuels despite the uncertainties over future supply and price levels. Which solution or which combination of solutions will enable operators to meet the requirement in the most cost-effective manner? In his TPM Asia keynote address, C.K. Yoo, president of South Korean-flag carrier Hyundai Merchant Marine will provide his thoughts on the implications of this important challenge and the way forward not just for owners and operators but also for the full maritime transportation value chain.

    • 9:45 amChina's Slowdown: What Does It Really Mean?

      Location: Espana Ballroom I

      After a strong performance in the first half of the year, China is well-positioned to meet its GDP growth projection of 6.5 percent for 2017. Although signs of a cooling economy started to emerge in the third quarter, container volume through the country’s main ports maintained its robust growth, and China continued to lead gains in containerized volumes on major trade lanes, including the transpacific. Although that growth is a welcome development for the industry, there is no guarantee it will continue as the Chinese economy undergoes what until now has been an orderly restructuring and slowdown. The underlying trend is that all of the country’s major industrial sectors are slowing while services expand to take up a larger portion of GDP. With industry accounting for more than 80 percent of the country’s trade, its slower growth path means by definition a weaker long-term outlook for China-related trade. In this speech, Xu Yating, IHS Markit’s Beijing-based China economist, will look at what is really going on in this transforming economy to support a better understanding of what China’s slowdown really means.

    • 10:15 amNetworking Coffee Break

      Location: Espana Ballroom Foyer

    • 10:45 amAsia Shipping Outlook: When Will The Market Turn (Again)?

      Location: Espana Ballroom I

      Container shipping in 2017 is enjoying something of a renaissance after several years of bleak earnings. Asia-Europe container volumes grew 3.9 percent in the first half of 2017, to 7.9 million TEU, but the volumes were accompanied by significantly higher spot market and contract rates, pushing up profitability for carriers on the trade. It’s a recovery carriers have been waiting for since 2011 and they are bullish in their predictions, as are analysts such as Drewry, which estimates an industrywide profit in 2017 of $5 billion. But this optimism is set to bump into an unsettling reality, with a huge amount of megaship capacity — 78 ships capable of carrying more than 14,000 TEU each — to be delivered between now and the end of 2019. In the fourth quarter of this year alone, data from shipping analyst SeaIntel show an Asia-Europe capacity expansion of 12 percent that not even a highly optimistic scenario of 8 percent growth in demand will absorb. So where does that leave the container shipping business in the year ahead? A panel of experts will examine the growth of the major economies, including a deep dive into China’s economic and trade data, and the container volume this is expected to generate on the east-west and regional trades. In addition, for the first time at TPM Asia, a top executive from the Shanghai Containerized Freight Index will identify trends in weekly spot rate movements and give shippers an idea of what to expect in 2018.

    • 12:00 pmNetworking Lunch

      Location: Espana Ballroom II & Barcelona

    • 1:00 pmAlliances Scorecard: Are Bcos Better Off Or Worse?

      Location: Espana Ballroom I

      When TPM Asia opens, we’ll be six months into the container shipping alliance structure. The new alliances — the Ocean, THE and the pre-existing 2M (plus Hyundai Merchant Marine) — got off to a rocky start in April, contributing to chronic congestion in Shanghai. Beyond that, shippers have been forced to adapt to the changing networks and capacity deployment, cuts in direct port calls, changing cargo flows, and fewer alternatives. Now that shippers and carriers have gotten through their first peak shipping season under the new structure, this session will evaluate how the new system is working for shippers, carriers, and forwarders, while examining the following questions: Are BCOs getting the services they expect at the right price? Is container shipping better off with the new alliances, and are terminals able to cope with the bigger ships and greater volumes being channeled into fewer hubs?

    • 2:00 pmPort Productivity In The Mega-Ship Era

      Location: Espana Ballroom I

      It is well and truly the era of the mega-ship — and not the “paltry” 10,000- or 13,000-TEU variety. Of the nearly 1.7 million TEU of capacity to be delivered by the end of 2017, 55 percent, or 920,000 TEU, will be distributed on 54 vessels of 14,000 to 21,000 TEU. Maersk Line has been taking delivery of its 11-vessel order of 20,600-TEU second-generation Triple-Es. MOL took delivery of the 20,000- TEU MOL Triumph in March, and five more of the vessels will be phased into the Asia-Europe routes. Hong Kong’s OOCL also has received its first 21,100-TEU ship with another five vessels to follow. These giant vessels will operate on the Asia-Europe trade within the new alliances, cascading capacity downstream while making fewer direct port calls and driving up transshipment volume that hub ports will struggle to handle. Oman’s Port of Salalah, for example, put 10 cranes on a big Maersk Line ship. That might look good, but is it feasible, and can the quayside operations handle the volume that comes with that kind of crane setup? This session will analyze the latest generation of vessels entering the Asia-Europe trade and its impact on ports, terminals, landside transportation, and, most importantly, beneficial cargo owners. It will include a presentation of exclusive IHS Markit data measuring the latest trends in berth productivity.

    • 3:00 pmNetworking Break

      Location: Espana Ballroom Foyer

    • 3:30 pmThe Role Of The NVOCC In A Changing Market

      Location: Espana Ballroom I

      Non-vessel-owning common carriers have been steadily growing their business on the Asia-US trade since the early 1990s and now control approximately 40 percent of the market. What is behind the growth of the NVOCC business, and is this growth expected to continue considering the changing dynamics of the container shipping industry? A panel of industry executives also will examine the real role of the NVO and whether it's a friend or foe of the carrier, and how the many small-to-huge NVOs fit into the global landscape.

    • 4:30 pmChina-Europe Rail — And Beyond

      Location: Espana Ballroom I

      There is a trade off between price and speed to market, and increasingly speed is winning. This is the driving force behind a growing interest in the China-Europe rail option. It unlocks the western regions of China and provides electronics and even higher fashion shippers a new route to the markets of Europe. The rail route between China and Europe, and the backhaul leg, has moved from an exotic alternative to air and ocean to a viable and regularly requested transport solution. Forwarders are steadily connecting new services to the rail network out of China and building road routes linking countries across Southeast Asia and South Asia. But the landbridge rail route is believed to be heavily subsidized by Beijing, so what happens to rates when those subsidies end? Is the China-Europe rail even viable without heavy subsidies, and will the capacity be able to meet the growing demand?

    • 5:30 pmNetworking Reception

      Location: The Galleon

Thursday, Oct 12, 2017

    • 7:30 amRegistration

      Location: Hotel Lobby

    • 7:30 amWelcome Coffee & Tea

      Location: Espana Ballroom Foyer

    • 8:25 amWelcome Remarks

      Location: Espana Ballroom I

    • 8:30 amA View From The Top: A Discussion With Industry Leaders

      Location: Espana Ballroom I

      Where is the industry headed? What does the future look like in this transformational year, which not has included unprecedented container carrier upheaval, but also a turnaround for ocean carriers, new geopolitical events such as the Brexit vote and the start of the Trump administration in the US that inevitably will affect the growth of trade volumes. What are the lasting lessons from the Hanjin collapse? What will the new emerging mega-carrier organizations like the so-called Japan Line look like and how will they behave in the market? What new minefields will shippers confront in 2018? How do industry leaders see the industry evolving for their businesses and for BCOs? This panel of leaders will address these and many other topics in what will be a wide-ranging, open and engaging discussion meant to chart the path forward through the uncertainty confronting the industry today.

    • 9:30 amDay 2 Keynote Address

      Location: Espana Ballroom I

      The convergence of multiple technologies at an unprecedented speed is being called the Fourth Industrial Revolution. Disruptive technologies are transforming the way most industries do business and forcing the complete revision of strategies to deal with new opportunities and threats that are often not coming from outside an organization but from within. So what does this mean for container shipping and for intercontinental supply chains? Wolfgang Lehmacher will outline the big picture and give an idea of what to expect.

    • 10:15 amNetworking Coffee Break

      Location: Espana Ballroom Foyer

    • 10:45 amProcess Improvement: How Is Technology Benefiting The BCO?

      Location: Espana Ballroom I

      There is no boilerplate when it comes to supply chain technology solutions and different BCOs have different needs. So what is out there and how can it be effectively used by shippers? BCO supply chains are becoming increasingly connected with a host of technology providers and forwarders offering automated solutions to areas such as rate management, rate benchmarking, freight booking. Automating manual processes provides valuable cost savings for shippers, with visibility and speed to market other areas of high priority. Are shippers taking advantage of the available technology and what needs to change for container lines to finally catch up with digiitization? What are the underlying systems at carriers and other parties that will significantly impact how quickly and to what extent digitization will develop in the near and long term? What about hurdles such as a lack of compatibility of legacy systems, strict oversight from competition authorities, cybersecurity and privacy issues, compliancy implementation including cost of investments to be made?

    • 11:30 amTechnology II: The BCO-Carrier View

      Location: Espana Ballroom I

      What do ocean carriers and hippers make of the dizzying array of new technology solutions now available — automated solutions to rate management, rate benchmarking, freight booking, container tracking, and predictive technologies? What do shippers really need and what are they willing to pay for? What makes the most sense? A panel of shippers will dive into this often hype-dominated topic and discuss the ways digitized solutions can add value and subtract costs from their supply chains.

    • 12:15 pmNetworking Lunch

      Location: Espana Ballroom II & Barcelona

    • 1:15 pmSourcing Shifts And China As A Buyer

      Location: Espana Ballroom I

      Suppliers in Asia report selling 30-50 percent of their manufactured goods into the China market as the country moves from supplier to buyer. This has influenced intra-Asia volumes that have been growing furiously in the first quarter of 2017, led by a 36 percent growth in volume year-over-year between China and Southeast Asia with an incredible 3.4 million TEU moving between the two regions. What is behind this growth and what impact is it having on freight rates, port infrastructure, and regional supply chains? How are sourcing strategies being adapted to cope with the changing regional trade flows?

    • 2:15 pmBuilding An E-Commerce Supply Chain: A Case Study With Adidas

      Location: Espana Ballroom I

      E-commerce across retail channels in Asia has gone from phenomenon to juggernaut. The Asia-Pacific retail e-commerce market, the world’s largest, surpassed $1 trillion for the first time in 2016 and is expected to exceed $2.7 trillion in 2020, according to research provider eMarket. That growth represents immense opportunity for retailers, suppliers, and service providers, but establishing an e-commerce operation — from selecting vendors to managing last-mile delivery — presents a host of challenges. In this highly anticipated address, Warren Ng, director of Southeast Asia operations for adidas, will explain how the sportswear and sneaker manufacturer is tackling and managing the operational headwinds while driving its e-commerce business forward. Among the topics he’ll address are Adidas’s e-commerce growth trends, its supply chain setup and flow, and how it’s expanding and managing its e-commerce operations through partnership and collaboration.

    • 2:45 pmThe Cyber Risk: Protecting Your Assets From An Invisible Attack

      Location: Espana Ballroom I

      There is a dark side to connecting all players in a supply chain. Data sharing opens all parties to cyber attacks and there is a greater need for tighter regulation of data protection, rapid disclosure of breaches, and the ability to react without causing delays. And if your company is hit by an attack, the damage can be deep and long-lasting. In 2011, the state-owned Islamic Republic of Iran Shipping Lines fell prey to a cyber attack. At the time, its 170-ship fleet was the largest in the Middle East, but the attack crashed the company’s system, and IRISL lost all of the data tracking its carriers. A lot of cargo simply disappeared before the shipping line could re-establish service. That same year, drug traffickers recruited hackers to penetrate computers at the Port of Antwerp where smugglers were able to move goods through the port, then delete any evidence the cargo was there. And just this past May, FedEx got caught up in a global ransomware attack, a breach in which hackers hold company computer systems hostage to ransom. Attacks on global retailers such as The Home Depot, Michaels Stores, Target, and Staples have been even more high-profile. Now, with rate and booking platforms playing an increasing role in the shipping process, and a massive push by carriers to digitize their business, the need to protect sensitive and proprietary data has never been more important. How can service providers, BCOs, and other supply chain interests protect themselves as business relationships evolve and the demands on stakeholders grow?

    • 3:45 pmClosing Remarks

      Location: Espana Ballroom I

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