What is the potential role of hydrogen in a net-zero carbon Europe?

A ‘net zero-carbon world’ will be the announced objective of the revised 2050 energy roadmap that the European Commission releases in 2018. If the European Union agrees to adopt this target, then by midcentury there will be no role for the unabated combustion of fossil fuels in EU countries;

  • Hydrogen is one option that is receiving increased attention. Hydrogen and other green gases can both address the short-term need for rapid greenhouse gas abatement and can provide a long-term solution to the difficulties of storing large volumes of energy over long periods of time. Hydrogen can be used in all energy sectors—for power generation, heat, industrial uses and transport
  • Energy suppliers, gas infrastructure companies, consumers and government have all started exploring the advantages of hydrogen. Public awareness and policy measures to encourage the development of hydrogen could allow for transformation of the energy industry by using the substantial natural gas infrastructure already in place while meeting long-term zero carbon targets
  • If conditions are right for widely adopting hydrogen, it can provide a truly transformational opportunity for the European energy transition

Ask us for details on this major study that provides the quantitative underpinning for a roadmap to net-zero carbon future for Europe facilitated by hydrogen.

Hydrogen in the Golden State

What is the potential role of hydrogen in a low-carbon California?

  • All eyes are on California, as it aspires to lead the US to a low and eventually net zero carbon future
  • A 40% reduction of economywide greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from 1990 levels by 2030 is required by law. Other policies encouraging the lower-carbon transition are the 60% renewable portfolio standard for electricity by 2030, the low carbon fuel standard for transportation fuels (which requires a 20% reduction in GHG intensity from 2007 to 2030) and programs targeting short-lived climate pollutants (e.g., methane)
  • As current clean energy goals near, political aspirations ratchet up. California Senate Bill 100, signed into law in September 2018, would require a 100% carbon-free power sector by 2045
  • Also in September 2018, California’s governor issued an executive order setting a statewide goal of carbon neutrality no later than 2045. This policy would apply to emissions across the state and aims to maintain net negative emissions after the carbon neutrality goal is achieved
  • Hydrogen deserves our attention as an option that can both address the short-term need for rapid greenhouse gas abatement and can provide a long-term solution to the difficulties of storing large volumes of energy over long periods of time. Hydrogen can be used in all energy sectors—for power generation, heat, industrial uses and transport
  • To meet the state’s emissions goals, reductions in the transportation sector will be critical. The state is investing in both electric and refueling stations, and is providing rebates for new vehicle purchases, in order to achieve 5 million zero emissions vehicles by 2030. Bills passed in 2018 also mandate plans to reduce emissions from ride hailing services and heavy duty vehicles
  • Energy suppliers, gas infrastructure companies, consumers and government have all started exploring the advantages of hydrogen. For some energy industry stakeholders hydrogen could be a threat, replacing conventional energy sources, while for other stakeholders it could be an opportunity to re-purpose the substantial natural gas infrastructure already in place while meeting long-term zero carbon targets

If conditions are right for widely adopting hydrogen, it can provide a truly transformational opportunity for both California and the US as a whole.

For more information on the European or California Hydrogen study, contact: Cristian Muresan

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